Forthcoming: The Handbook of Lexical Functional Grammar

Mary Dalrymple  

Synopsis

Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG) is a nontransformational theory of
linguistic structure, first developed in the 1970s by Joan Bresnan and
Ronald M. Kaplan, which assumes that language is best described and
modeled by parallel structures representing different facets of
linguistic organization and information, related by means of
functional correspondences. This volume has five parts. Part I,
History and Overview, provides historical background on the
development of the theory, and an introduction to core syntactic
concepts and representations. Part II, Grammatical Phenomena, reviews
LFG work on a range of grammatical phenomena or constructions. Part
III, Grammatical modules and interfaces, provides an overview of LFG
work on semantics, argument structure, prosody, information structure,
and morphology. Part IV, Linguistic disciplines, reviews LFG work in
the disciplines of historical linguistics, learnability,
psycholinguistics, and second language learning. Part V, Formal and
computational issues and applications, provides an overview of
computational and formal properties of the theory, implementations,
and computational work on parsing, translation, grammar induction, and
treebanks. Part VI, Language families and regions, reviews LFG work
on languages spoken in particular geographical areas or in particular
language families. The final section, Comparing LFG with other
linguistic theories, discusses LFG work in relation to other
theoretical approaches.

Chapters

  • PART I: HISTORY AND OVERVIEW
  • History of Lexical Functional Grammar
    Ronald M. Kaplan
  • Core concepts of LFG
    Oleg Belyaev
  • Grammatical functions: their classification and properties
    Oleg Belyaev
  • PART II: GRAMMATICAL PHENOMENA
  • Anaphora
    György Rákosi
  • Agreement
    Dag Haug
  • Case
    Miriam Butt
  • Complex predicates
    Avery D. Andrews
  • Coordination
    Agnieszka Patejuk, Adam Przepiórkowski
  • Copular constructions
    Helge Dyvik
  • Clause structure and configurationality
    Avery D. Andrews
  • Long-distance dependencies
    Annie Zaenen
  • Negation
    Oliver Bond
  • Noun phrases in LFG
    Kersti Börjars, John J. Lowe
  • Polysynthesis
    Amy Dahlstrom
  • Pronoun incorporation
    Ida Toivonen
  • Raising and control
    Nigel Vincent
  • PART III: GRAMMATICAL MODULES AND INTERFACES
  • Glue Semantics
    Ash Asudeh
  • Argument structure and mapping theory
    Jamie Y. Findlay, Anna Kibort
  • Prosody and its interfaces
    Tina Bögel
  • Information structure
    Annie Zaenen
  • Morphology
    Ash Asudeh, Paul B. Melchin, Daniel Siddiqi
  • PART IV: LINGUISTIC DISCIPLINES
  • LFG and historical linguistics
    Hannah Booth, Miriam Butt
  • LFG, Optimality Theory and learnability of languages
    Jonas Kuhn
  • LFG and psycholinguistics
    Stephen Jones
  • LFG and second language learning: Processability Theory
    Bruno di Biase, Marco Magnani
  • PART V: FORMAL AND COMPUTATIONAL ISSUES AND APPLICATIONS
  • Formal and computational properties of LFG
    Ronald M. Kaplan, Jürgen Wedekind
  • Computational implementations and applications
    Martin Forst, Tracy Holloway King
  • LFG at scale: Parsing, translation, and grammar induction
    Aoife Cahill, Andy Way
  • LFG treebanks
    Victoria Rosén
  • PART VI: LANGUAGE FAMILIES AND REGIONS
  • LFG and African languages
    Adams Bodomo, Dewei Che
  • LFG and the languages of the Americas
    Amy Dahlstrom
  • LFG and the languages of Australia
    Rachel Nordlinger
  • LFG and Austronesian languages
    I Wayan Arka, Eleanor Ridge
  • LFG and Celtic languages
    Jenny Graver
  • LFG and Continental West Germanic languages
    Gerlof Bouma
  • LFG and Finno-Ugric languages
    Tibor Laczkó
  • LFG and Indo-Iranian languages
    John Payne
  • LFG and Japanese and Korean
    Ryo Otoguro
  • LFG and Romance languages
    Alex Alsina
  • LFG and Scandinavian languages
    Helge Lødrup
  • LFG and Semitic languages
    Louisa Sadler
  • LFG and Sinitic languages
    Olivia S-C. Lam, One-Soon Her
  • LFG and Slavic languages
    Bozhil Hristov
  • PART VII: COMPARING LFG WITH OTHER LINGUISTIC THEORIES
  • LFG and Cognitive and Constructional Theories
    Yo Matsumoto
  • LFG and Dependency Grammar
    Dag Haug
  • LFG and Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar
    Adam Przepiórkowski
  • LFG and Minimalism
    Peter Sells
  • LFG and Role and Reference Grammar
    Delia Bentley, Nigel Vincent
  • LFG and Simpler Syntax
    Giuseppe Varaschin
  • LFG and Tree Adjoining Grammar
    Jamie Y. Findlay

Author Biography

Mary Dalrymple

Mary Dalrymple is Professor of Syntax at the University of Oxford. She received her PhD from the Department of Linguistics, Stanford University. Before moving to Oxford she was Computer Scientist at SRI International, Menlo Park, California; Member of the Research Staff, Xerox PARC, Palo Alto, California; and Senior Lecturer, Department of Computer Science, King's College London. Her work explores issues in syntax, semantics, and the syntax-semantics interface, often within the theory of Lexical Functional Grammar. She is also involved in language documentation, with a particular focus on Austronesian and Papuan languages. She has authored or coauthored five books, most recently the Oxford Reference Guide to Lexical Functional Grammar, with John J. Lowe and Louise Mycock.

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Published

May 3, 2021
LaTeX source on GitHub

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.